ASMR: My Personal Happy High

When I was a young child, I used to love the boring instructional videos they would sometimes play in school. I distinctly remember in fourth grade, we had to watch an instructional video about how to properly use a compass. Everyone was scowling and eventually talking during the video. But it was like I was in a trance. I was captivated by the man's voice in the video. I felt calm and content.

This continued to happen throughout my life, and my brother and sister were the only ones who seemed to understand what I meant. When YouTube first became popular, I would look for haul videos without background music because I would experience the same feeling as the instructional video. 

I also experienced it in real life. When my aunt did my make up, I felt it. When the school counselor talked to me about my future plans, I barely paid attention to what she was actually saying because I was so chilled out by her voice.

When I hit my twenties, I finally found out that 1.) I was not the only one who experienced this feeling, 2.) there was an actual term for the feeling, and 3.) There were people on YouTube who had created a community for this purpose. The feeling is called Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR). Here is the Wikipedia definition:

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a neologism for a perceptual phenomenon characterized as a distinct, pleasurable tingling sensation in the head, scalp, back, or peripheral regions of the body in response to visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or cognitive stimuli. The nature and classification of the ASMR phenomenon is controversial, with strong anecdotal evidence to support the phenomenon but little or no scientific explanation or verified data.

Only certain people will experience ASMR. For those who do not experience it, the ASMR videos on YouTube seem creepy and strange. Specific triggers are usually things like voices with accents, whispering, softly spoken voice, tapping, paper wrapping crinkles, water sounds, writing or typing sounds, kissing sounds, sksk sounds, hairbrushing and many others. Personally, I never experience ASMR from tapping or sksk noises, but I guess some people do?

Whenever I'm stressed or cannot sleep, these videos help greatly. I love many ASMR artists, but the one who always seems to make me sleep well is Springbok ASMR. Look her up on YT if you like ASMR. I especially liked her hotel check in video!

If you want to know if you experience ASMR, look it up and listen with good headphones. If it just creeps you out, you probably do not have it. If you feel like you're pleasantly calm, then chances are you have the ability to experience ASMR.



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* n i c o c . o: ASMR: My Personal Happy High

Friday, December 26, 2014

ASMR: My Personal Happy High

When I was a young child, I used to love the boring instructional videos they would sometimes play in school. I distinctly remember in fourth grade, we had to watch an instructional video about how to properly use a compass. Everyone was scowling and eventually talking during the video. But it was like I was in a trance. I was captivated by the man's voice in the video. I felt calm and content.

This continued to happen throughout my life, and my brother and sister were the only ones who seemed to understand what I meant. When YouTube first became popular, I would look for haul videos without background music because I would experience the same feeling as the instructional video. 

I also experienced it in real life. When my aunt did my make up, I felt it. When the school counselor talked to me about my future plans, I barely paid attention to what she was actually saying because I was so chilled out by her voice.

When I hit my twenties, I finally found out that 1.) I was not the only one who experienced this feeling, 2.) there was an actual term for the feeling, and 3.) There were people on YouTube who had created a community for this purpose. The feeling is called Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR). Here is the Wikipedia definition:

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is a neologism for a perceptual phenomenon characterized as a distinct, pleasurable tingling sensation in the head, scalp, back, or peripheral regions of the body in response to visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or cognitive stimuli. The nature and classification of the ASMR phenomenon is controversial, with strong anecdotal evidence to support the phenomenon but little or no scientific explanation or verified data.

Only certain people will experience ASMR. For those who do not experience it, the ASMR videos on YouTube seem creepy and strange. Specific triggers are usually things like voices with accents, whispering, softly spoken voice, tapping, paper wrapping crinkles, water sounds, writing or typing sounds, kissing sounds, sksk sounds, hairbrushing and many others. Personally, I never experience ASMR from tapping or sksk noises, but I guess some people do?

Whenever I'm stressed or cannot sleep, these videos help greatly. I love many ASMR artists, but the one who always seems to make me sleep well is Springbok ASMR. Look her up on YT if you like ASMR. I especially liked her hotel check in video!

If you want to know if you experience ASMR, look it up and listen with good headphones. If it just creeps you out, you probably do not have it. If you feel like you're pleasantly calm, then chances are you have the ability to experience ASMR.



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